Strength, Not Size

Godsize

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"Strength, Not Size"
#1
Anyone know a good way to train that will definitely make you stronger, but not much bigger? Or do the two just go hand in hand? I've known a lot of stringy, ropey motherfuckers who were dumb strong, but not massive at all. How do you do that?
 
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"Strength, Not Size"
#2
High reps. There was a time that I trained like this and was ripped as hell. I only weighed 112 pounds but could bench press 215(I broke the previous state record by 75 pounds!) Anyway, I'd do about 15-20 reps and 3 sets of everthing.
I barely put on any size or weight. This was not by choice, but by inexperience. I wondered why I didn't put any weight on.

Why do you want to train like this? The only people I've seen that actually train like this are athletes.
 

bigbutnottoo

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"Strength, Not Size"
#3
Overtraining can also make you weaker though.

I would say explosive reps, negatives, and partials.

As far as strength=size. I would say it's more that increased strength enables you to put on size.
 

Godsize

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"Strength, Not Size"
#4
Wouldn't the best way to get stronger be to just lift as heavy as you can in good form? Then after a while, increase the weight? But that's bound to get you bigger, no? I don't want the "all show and no go" kind of muscle.

What about "Positions of Flexion" types of workouts? I was thinking about picking that up again. What do you guys think of that?
 

bigbutnottoo

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"Strength, Not Size"
#5
I wouldn't worry too muchabout gaining size. I know you dont want to get too big, but you probably won't unless you are on anabolics, consuming mega calories and/or have extremely musclebound familymembers. Its probably a good idea to add some size anyway as it will help with aging,declining metabolism,etc.
 
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"Strength, Not Size"
#6
Originally posted by bigbutnottoo
Overtraining can also make you weaker though.

I would say explosive reps, negatives, and partials.

As far as strength=size. I would say it's more that increased strength enables you to put on size.
Many people mistake overtraining with doing high reps. This is far from the truth. Overtraining is not getting enough rest before working out again or bringing a muscle to failure more times than needed. For example, doing 3 sets of bench presses, then 3 sets of pec flys, then 3 sets of incline bench all in the same workout. Professional athletes like basketball players and running backs do over 50 repititions of squats. This is because it makes the muscles much stronger, with more stamina.

I've been lifting weights for around 6 years now and have tried many different workouts. High repititions never hurt me and always made me strong without putting on much size.
 

bigbutnottoo

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"Strength, Not Size"
#7
Yes, you are correct. However, I am more for finding the most efficient way to do any work. Meaning, you could do endless reps, but at some point, diminishing returns kick in. Your point about taking it to failure is key, though. Since failure is failure, once it is reached, there is no point in doing more. You are right though, my previous post was lazy and rest periods are really the key for growth.
 
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"Strength, Not Size"
#8
size is more about diet than training, by far
to put it simply, if you eat the same amount of calories you need to maintain your bodyweight you will not gain size, but you might gain strength, albeit probably less than you would if you consumed more protein and calories.

strength is best developed with low reps, not only to train the muscles but to develop connective tissues and to train the nervous system. That is an important subject in strength training, you should check out www.testosterone.net if you're interested
 

bigbutnottoo

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"Strength, Not Size"
#9
Originally posted by quijjiboo
size is more about diet than training, by far
to put it simply, if you eat the same amount of calories you need to maintain your bodyweight you will not gain size,
No, it just means you wont gain weight,not size. Back in the day, I added over 1" to my chest and arms in 1 month, while also losing 20 pounds.
 
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