DLD

doublelongdaddy
Staff member
Plyometric Blasters
Overview

This is a new theory I have been working on and wanted to share some of the research I have done and introduce a new exercise that I have been experimenting with using this data. The exercise is Plyometrics Blasters and my main goal in this exercise is to employ 3 main areas of science in hopes to create a more effective method to stretching . The first is Blasters and how the reverse kegel allows more efficient lig stretching . The second is the way we mentally react to a stretch . The third is how Plyometrics integrated into Blasters may create the most effective stretch possible. I want to generate a discussion on these topics and get your feedback on its possible application in your programs. I do warn that Plyometrics is considered dangerous if not done correctly and anyone attemping this type of training should exercise extreme caution.

When the suspensory ligament is stretched, so is the ligament spindle. The ligament spindle records the change in length (and how fast) and sends signals to the spine that convey this information. This triggers the stretch reflex (also called the myotatic reflex), which attempts to resist the change in ligament length by causing the stretched ligament to contract. The more sudden the change in ligament length , the stronger the ligament contractions will be (Plyometric training is based on this fact [Plyometrics are any exercise where the muscle is contracted eccentrically then immediately, concentrically meaning the muscle is stretched before it is contracted.]). This basic function of the ligament spindle helps to protect the body from injury. Ligaments contain an abundance of specialized sensory receptors known as "proprioceptors." Proprioceptors function as "stretch detectors" or "tension-detectors." When you stretch your penis the proprioceptors that supply the tissues are stretched, put under tension, or distorted. This causes the sensory nerve fibers that supply these proprioceptors to be stimulated, and changes the frequency at which electrical impulses are sent to the brain. The brain "interprets" the frequency code of the electrical signals and uses this information to determine and adjust the direction, velocity, and duration of the movement. In simple terms we have an immediate and uncontrolled reaction when we engage the ligament in a load greater than the normal amount of force. DLD Blasters are based on this concept using our ability to consciously interrupt this sequence by engaging the reverse kegel.

Going one step beyond this function and understanding Plyometrics and how they can apply to ligaments and stretch reflex I think may even bring us closer to a more effective method of not only ligament stretching but also tunica elongation since the tunica also contains similar proprioceptor function.

One of the reasons for holding a stretch for a prolonged period of time is that as you remain in a stretched position, the ligament spindle habituates (becomes accustomed to the new length ) and reduces its signaling. Gradually, you can train your stretch receptors to allow greater lengthening of the ligament hence permanent penis lengthening. The Pulse 110 stretches brought me one step closer to understanding Plyometrics and their role in penis enlargement. Looking beyond this and applying not only repetitive pulsations to the ligaments and tunica but also range of motion got me very interested in animated stretches using all of the above theory. This is why I decided to try Rotary Blasters. Rotary Blasters encapsulate range of motion, proprioceptor function (or in this case lack there of) and when combined with the elements of Pulse 110 repetition (Plyometrics Exercise). Now Rotary Blasters do employ 2 factors in this concept being proprioceptor response by the use of reverse kegel and range of motion. Pulse 110’s touch on the concept of Plyometrics is the sense of a repetitive quick stretches would have a shock effect on the ligament and tunica. In my opinion neither stretch fully integrates the above concept but together they do have the potential to change the way we stretch on many levels.

Understanding the above information and how our muscles, tissue, ligaments and tendons react to this information gives me a better idea of how we should perform stretching exercises. I do not think we are that off base but I do think an important component may be left out being Plyometrics. Plyometrics in stretching would be fast, heavy, intense stretches going from 0% of a hold to 110% of a stretch in quick 1-second pulses. Very similar to doing push-ups with a clap in between each rep. In this case the clap would be the release and the actual push-up would be the heavy stretch . This in a nutshell is Plyometrics. These are similar to Pulse 110’s but an important extra step is taken as in Plyometrics we release the stretch to 0% tension before engaging the next repetition at 110%. Proprioceptor function or "stretch detectors" are now fooled in a sense because the repetition confuses the actual brain function and with each repetition the electrical response to the ligament is weaker and weaker allowing the ligament to become more and more distorted from it’s original pre-determined size.

Evidence of this being more fact than theory is tricky and in my case slightly painful to prove but I think I inadvertently stumbled on to a very important piece of data during a recent stretching session. I did Plyometric Blasters, which at first were scary, but I made it through a set of 500 with no incident. Immediately following the session my ligs and penis were sore. This is a good sign to someone like me that has been stretching for a few years with rare moments of actual lig and/or tunica soreness. This paled next to the fact that immediately after the exercise my lower vertebrae had a slight strained feeling. At first it did not strike me as anything important but then I remembered Proprioceptor function. Proprioceptor function, in this case, was the culprit of the back pain I had directly following the exercise. Why? Because I was signaling to my brain that I was going beyond the normal load of intensity and the Proprioceptor response resulted in slight back strain. A very similar reaction to this would be almost getting in an accident and your Proprioceptor respond in a instant causing that strained back feeling we get right after a close accident. Using this same example of a close car accident and the Proprioceptor response to that accident brings us even closer to understanding the mental dynamics of Plyometrics and my theory on incorporating these into our stretching routines.

The brain builds up tolerance in a sense to a repetive action. In the cognitive world when a psychologist wants to change a programmed response it is called aversion therapy. Basically training the brain to respond differently to a programmed reaction by direct, repetitive, exposure. We have a natural reaction to certain things, a reaction that we are not in control of. For instance if we feel a sharp tickle on the back of our necks the normal, immediate response would be to swat at it thinking a bug has landed on our neck. Now when a person is continuously exposed to this feeling on the back of their neck and each time there is no bug present the brain will eventually stop the immediate reaction thinking that there is no danger. It retrains itself to have a different impulse to a long programmed reaction.

This is the exercise that I am using to apply the information that I have been studying. I am the lab rat in this and want to stress again that Plyometric exercise is risky and I warn anyone who is going to try this to use extreme caution. Plyometrics used in a weight training situation is suggested only once or twice per week. These are not a replacement for basic stretching exercises but an addition.


Plyometric Blasters
Exercise

While seated, in a completely flaccid state grab your penis with the standard ok grip just below the glans and get into the A-Stretch (other stretch position can be substituted if the A-Stretch does not agree with you). Engage in a reverse kegel. Remaining in the reverse kegel with no tension applied prepare to start the exercise. In 1 second repetitions, using a slight jerking motion, stretch to full capacity (100%) than go back to a non-tension position (0%). Continue to do this in strict form continuously for 100 repetitions. After 100 reps. Rest for one minute than repeat the above for 5-10 sets.
 
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Great concept, just in time for my daily stretching routine too. Think I'll go mess around with a few of these and see what happens. One question though, would putting this much stress on the ligs and tunica mean that you should take extra rest time?
 
Real interesting opening for a thread DLD. I also get soreness in my lower back after a really good stretching set. Kinda like the feeling after you have been riding a motorcycle for a long time. My thoughts for the blasters, is maybe learning more how to relax the muscle so the stretch can be just as effective or even more without being so dynamic (tension oriented). There is a Russian Kinesiology expert (he has way too many degrees and letters after his name)
named Pavel Tsatsoline. He worked with Spetsnaz and has come up with many different ideas on how evoke maximum stretching with minimal effort. How to train the body w/o having warm ups and getting beyond normal stretch reflex. I will search my notes and come up with some cool relative stuff. But, I do think that the rotary blasters with the pulsing, will be very close to that. Starting with training to fatigue, then to push so we can neurologically imprint that reflex to the ligaments and subsequently the tunica.
We can then train to beyond the set parameters we once thought. Give me a little time and I will either post it or e-mail to you so you can see what you like....But definately good start to this.
 

Girthius

Member
This really looks promising DLD! I'll have a go tonight! I do something similar with hanging ! I call it "sudden impact hanging ". I put about 10lbs on my weight holder, then I put on a device that fits over the holder, this weighs about 5lbs, and it has some nylon cord attached on the sides, so that I can support it with my hands. Once I start hanging the 10lbs, I drop the 5lbs on top of it, from a height of about 1-2", kind of like a power driver! I do this repeatedly (30 reps)! I have only started doing this, so it's early stages yet! It's also very risky, and should be approached with extreme caution!!

Girthius
 
Girthius,
wow man, I know you already said it but be careful......... Atleast with our hands we retain the sensitivity to pull back and control what we do. Once you let go it's all up to the Gods.....
 

Super

Super Moderator
I thought you were going to incorporate, the Pulse 110's and the Rotery Blasters in this?
 

crazyed27

Active member
girthius said:
This really looks promising DLD! I'll have a go tonight! I do something similar with hanging ! I call it "sudden impact hanging ". I put about 10lbs on my weight holder, then I put on a device that fits over the holder, this weighs about 5lbs, and it has some nylon cord attached on the sides, so that I can support it with my hands. Once I start hanging the 10lbs, I drop the 5lbs on top of it, from a height of about 1-2", kind of like a power driver! I do this repeatedly (30 reps)! I have only started doing this, so it's early stages yet! It's also very risky, and should be approached with extreme caution!!

Girthius
Dude your a brave as hell!
 

lonerj

Member
Awesome...

I've been doing something like this when I was doing manual stretching .

I basically did reps of tugging because I inadvertently thought that it would "shock" the cells to respond beyond the normal stretching . You definetly feel the sore. You're on to something good DLD.

Soreness is good.
 

crazyed27

Active member
I've been using this polymetric concept without even realizing it until now. Special thanks to the not so simple DLD for bringing this to our vision. Very interesting read DLD! I too have experinced lower back pain recently after using the polymetric concept. I was thinking I had just slept wrong or something but now I realize exactly waht was causing the pain.
 
crazyed27 said:
I've been using this polymetric concept without even realizing it until now. Special thanks to the not so simple DLD for bringing this to our vision. Very interesting read DLD! I too have experinced lower back pain recently after using the polymetric concept. I was thinking I had just slept wrong or something but now I realize exactly waht was causing the pain.
The pain is coming from the agonist/antagonist relationship of the muscles.
Kind of like when your hip flexors are tight your lower back is and vice versa..
if we can learn to relax throughout the stretch , then we should in theory be able to stretch further because we will have less tension pulling us back. By less tension I mean by the opposite muscles.
 
I think the rotary blasters kinda encapsulates that in its description. And when doing the movement the pulsing should just go with it
 
DLD, with every rep do you do another revers kegel, or focus on a prolonged one? I'm doing another stretch session after lunch, will add this to finish up the session.
 
crazycanuck said:
DLD, with every rep do you do another revers kegel, or focus on a prolonged one? I'm doing another stretch session after lunch, will add this to finish up the session.
I would think reverse on eveyone....that way you can work the pulsing part of it...whaddya think DLD??
 
I just did these straight down. I held a reverse kegal through the whole exercise, then grabbed right behind the head, quickly pull to full stretch for one second, release for one second x 200. My ligs still feel like they got there asses kicked. This is really cool because usually I can't get much of a good post-workout after lig stretches . Great exercise DLD!
 
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